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Grays Harbor County has just joined the state wide3 burn ban enacted yesterday that expanded the burn ban to also include campfires, and any outdoor burning permitting only Liquid gas or propane camp stoves that- do not .use solid briquettes and have on/off controls

MONTESANO — Effective 12:01 A.M. Thursday, August 18, 2016, Grays Harbor County Fire Districts and Fire Departments in cooperation with the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency (ORCAA), will be expanding restrictions on all outdoor burning to include prohibiting camp and recreational fires. All outdoor burning is prohibited until further notice.


The County and Statewide burn ban applies to state forests, state parks and forestlands protected by DNR firefighters and all unincorporated portions of Grays Harbor County. This ban prohibits all outdoor burning, including campfires in fire pits and the use of charcoal briquettes. 


Liquid gas or propane camp stoves that- do not .use solid briquettes and have on/off controls are permitted.


The statewide ban does not include federally-owned lands such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas administered by federal agencies.


For more information on local fire restrictions 
Grays Harbor County: Fire 'Marshal's Office at (360) 249-4222

The expanded burn ban does not include county, and private property, national parks and federal lands. 

 

OLYMPIA – With the arrival this week of the most dangerous fire weather of the year, Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark is expanding the statewide burn baneffective noon today, Aug. 17 to prohibit all campfires on DNR-protected lands throughSept. 30, 2016.

“After a relatively mild summer, we are entering a period of critical fire weather on both sides of the Cascades,” said Goldmark. “The greatest fire danger right now comes from carelessness. It’s essential that people understand the risks involved and do not spark any fires.”

                  

Goldmark sees special wildfire risk over the coming days throughout the state, as high-pressure weather patterns will keep away the marine moisture that normally limits the spread of wildfire. The ability of Washington’s forests and grasslands to resist wildfire remains weakened after last year’s record drought.

The statewide burn ban applies to state forests, state parks and forestlands protected by DNR firefighters. It prohibits all outdoor burning, including campfires in fire pits and the use of charcoal briquettes. Liquid or propane camp stoves that do not use solid briquettes and have on/off controls are permitted. 

The statewide ban does not include federally-owned lands such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas administered by federal agencies.

This fire season to date, there have been 527 fires on 3,372 acres. By comparison, at this point in 2015, there had been 803 fires burning 319,551 acres. In 2014 by this date, there were 590 fires burning 190,742 acres. 

In 2015, a record drought, low snowpack and weeks of hot, dry weather brought Washington’s worst-ever wildfire season, burning more than a million acres across the state. 

“Our fire crews have been effective so far this season in keeping fires small and getting them out quickly,” said Goldmark. “I ask all Washingtonians to give them a hand by being careful and responsible when working or playing on our iconic landscapes.”

DNR’s wildfire mission

Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department, responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state, and tribal-owned forestlands in Washington. During fire season, DNR’s wildfire force includes more than 1,300 trained employees. DNR also participates in Washington's coordinated interagency approach to firefighting.

While this burn ban only covers DNR lands, please consider these steps for your own property and personal recreation as the current weather pattern and moisture has tapered off and brush is more tinder at this time of year. 

OLYMPIA – With the arrival of warm summer temperatures and below normal precipitation in western Washington, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has expanded its burn ban to cover the entire state.

                                                                                       

The statewide burn ban will run from July 29 through Sept. 30. A burn ban for DNR-protected lands in eastern Washington has been in effect since July 2. The ban may be extended or shortened based on fire weather.

 

“The arrival of summer weather creates greater danger for wildfires, which are serious threats to safety, property and habitat. We have already seen a number of roadside fires start on both sides of the Cascades,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “We must be cautious and vigilant to minimize the damage to our state.”

The ban means outdoor burning is prohibited on all forestlands that DNR protects from wildfire. Anyone caught violating the burn ban can face fines. Prescribed ecological burns approved by DNR will be allowed if expressly approved by Commissioner Goldmark.

 

Recreational fires in approved fire pits within designated state, county, municipal and other campgrounds are allowed.

DNR’s burn ban does not apply to federally-owned lands, such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas administered by federal agencies. Counties and local fire districts may have additional burn restrictions.

 

So far this year, DNR has had 408 wildfire starts throughout the state.

 

Fireworks and incendiary devices, such as exploding targets, sky lanterns, or tracer ammunition, are illegal on all DNR-protected forestlands.

For a copy of the Commissioner’s Order, go to http://www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-bans.

The Grays Harbor Fire District 2, along with the Central Park and Brady Fire Associations, will once again host National Night Out Against Crime events on Tuesday, August 2nd.

National Night Out Against Crime events are done in an effort to bring the community closer together in an annual community building campaign that promotes police-community partnerships and neighborhood camaraderie to make neighborhoods a safer and a better place to live. Together, we are making that happen through our partnerships with different agencies and associations.

 

Grays Harbor Fire District 2 Events will be hosted by the Central Park Fire and Brady Fire Associations with the Brady station event cohosted once again with the Winkleman Road and Brady Bottoms Block Watch groups.

Both the Central Park and Brady Fire stations will be having a hamburger barbecue, chips and more provided by all of the groups involved. Fire, EMS and response equipment will be on display along with some other events to promote a fun, safe and crime awareness in the community.

This year the Brady Association is working on some new kids obstacles and relays to add to the fun.

The event will take place on August 2nd, 2016 at 6 PM at the Central Park and Brady Fire Stations. Address and location can be found on our website ghfd2.org

The coordinated response between 8 local and federal agencies led to the successful rescue of 57-year old Grays Harbor county man late Monday morning. Grays Harbor E911 received a report at approximately 1:00 p.m. Sunday, July 17 for the report of a hiker with a broken lower leg in the Olympic National Park. The report was made by fellow hikers who hiked back out from the wilderness area around the southern portion of Mount Hoquiam to their vehicles and then drove to the Wynoochee Dam Public Use are to make the call. The actual injury originally occurred at approximately 11:00 a.m. Olympic National Park staff filled logistics and incident management roles, while personnel from Grays Harbor Fire District 2 and Grays Harbor County Sheriff’s Office responded to the area to make contact with the reporting hikers. The terrain in the area was described as extremely steep and rugged. It had taken the two hikers approximately an hour to travel three-quarters of a mile back to their vehicle on Forest Service Road 2270. Initial efforts were made by a Naval Air Station Whidbey Island helicopter rescue crew to locate the patient. Unable to pinpoint their location due to low cloud cover over the area, Navy rescue personnel and one of the reporting hikers were placed on the ground to access the patient and companion hiker on foot. Grays Harbor Sheriff’s Office Deputies and Search and Rescue personnel also were making attempts to locate the subjects from the point where they went cross

The report was made by fellow hikers who hiked back out from the wilderness area around the southern portion of Mount Hoquiam to their vehicles and then drove to the Wynoochee Dam Public Use are to make the call. The actual injury originally occurred at approximately 11:00 a.m. Olympic National Park staff filled logistics and incident management roles, while personnel from Grays Harbor Fire District 2 and Grays Harbor County Sheriff’s Office responded to the area to make contact with the reporting hikers. The terrain in the area was described as extremely steep and rugged. It had taken the two hikers approximately an hour to travel three-quarters of a mile back to their vehicle on Forest Service Road 2270. Initial efforts were made by a Naval Air Station Whidbey Island helicopter rescue crew to locate the patient. Unable to pinpoint their location due to low cloud cover over the area, Navy rescue personnel and one of the reporting hikers were placed on the ground to access the patient and companion hiker on foot. Grays Harbor Sheriff’s Office Deputies and Search and Rescue personnel also were making attempts to locate the subjects from the point where they went cross

Initial efforts were made by a Naval Air Station Whidbey Island helicopter rescue crew to locate the patient. Unable to pinpoint their location due to low cloud cover over the area, Navy rescue personnel and one of the reporting hikers were placed on the ground to access the patient and companion hiker on foot. Grays Harbor Sheriff’s Office Deputies and Search and Rescue personnel also were making attempts to locate the subjects from the point where they went cross country off the 2270 road and headed north towards Mount Hoquiam. Due to weather conditions creating poor visibility for helicopter crews, the decision was made to shelter the patient in place for

Due to weather conditions creating poor visibility for helicopter crews, the decision was made to shelter the patient in place for night. Personnel from the Olympic Mountain Rescue team travelled to the patient and Navy rescuers after dark to bring them additional water, food and sleeping bags. All 5 of the responders remained with patient and his climbing companion throughout the night. Navy medics provided care for the patient and prepared him for transport the next day.

At 08:15 a.m. Monday morning, a second group of rescuers began the hike to the patient’s location to begin extraction by ground if weather did not improve. This group was comprised of Olympic Mountain Rescue, Thurston County Special Operations Rescue Team, National Park Service and Grays Harbor Fire District 2 personnel. As the ground crew made their way towards the shelter site, the weather began to improve providing a short window of opportunity for Coast Guard and Navy helicopters to rescue the patient and pick up rescuers. Coast Guard Station Astoria helicopter crews transported the patient to the Olympia airport where he was transported by ambulance to St. Peter Hospital in Olympia.

The rescue of hiker would not been successful without the cooperation of all of the agencies. Incident command and coordination for this roughly 26-hour search and rescue mission was provided in partnership between Grays Harbor Sheriff’s Department, Grays Harbor Fire District 2 and the Olympic National Park.

Tuesday June 7th , 9 volunteer firefighters from Grays Harbor Fire District 2 and Montesano Fire Department celebrated completing the 2016 Joint District 2 / Montesano Fire Firefighter 1 Academy. 

This years academy was the first joint District 2 and Montesano Fire Department Academy, with it being the 4th in this format for Fire District 2. The academy helps certify volunteers for the International Firefighters Service Accreditation Congress Fire Fighter 1 certification.  The certification helps prepare volunteers for the initial stages of fighting fires in a professional manner for their departments and also can set the stage for each member to further their interest in the fire service for a career department.    

      This year these 9 volunteers went through over 240 hours of classroom training, hands on live fire training and hazmat courses.  At the end of having to participate in classes for almost 5 months using up 2 days a week and several weekends these volunteers have all passed and completed all testing requirements to gain their professional certification.

      Fire District 2 Chief Johnson says “This year’s class was the first class of the 4 that we have done that all volunteers are at the same stage and completion for their certifications where they have all completed and passed.  It is a great accomplishment for not only the students, but the staff that put on the training”.

      Montesano Volunteer LieutenantJeff Smith was the class Valedictorian who was also selected as the Most Inspirational (an award voted on by the recruits). Fire District 2’s volunteer Dakota Hathaway was given the most improved award.    

      Instructors for the joint academy were a crucial factor in putting the academy together for these 9 volunteers as they have to put in just as much time, if not more than those taking the course.  All staff members that put on the training whether they were volunteers or department staff did this all in their free time, off the clock with dedication to their community and agencies. 

      The 9 volunteers completing this years academy are only just in their beginning stages to serving their community with more training ahead for either a first responder or emergency medical technician ems course being next on their agenda. 

Grays Harbor Fire District #2 volunteer firefighter Charles Maloney
received the annual Fred Allinson Award for earning top scholastic honors
among the 217 attendees at the 2016 Washington State Fire Fighters’
Association (WSFFA) 93rd Annual Conference and Fire School June 3-5 in
Wenatchee.

Maloney was awarded the annual Fred Allinson Award for having the highest test scores from the courses offered at this years conference amongst the other 217 attendees.

Firefighter Maloney has achieved this in three of the past four
WSFFA Fire Schools. The award is named for one of Washington
State’s first fire service training officers.

Firefighter Maloney began his fire service career 26 years ago with
Woodinville Fire & Rescue. He has served with Grays Harbor FD #2 since
1996. The Montesano resident is assigned to Station 32 in Brady.

Founded in 1923, WSFFA is the oldest statewide fire service organization.
Its mission is to represent the interests of the volunteer firefighters
and EMS responders throughout the state of Washington. Membership includes
more than 400 fire departments and districts, representing approximately
16,000 volunteers.

Grays Harbor Fire District No. 2 responded to a vehicle fire threatening a structure at 81 Camp Creek
Road early on March 23, 2016. Grays Harbor 911 received a call from the homeowner at 03:20 a.m.
reporting that he was woke up by noise outside his residence and discovered the semi-truck parked
next to the residence on fire.

Fire District 2 arrived to find a 1995 International semi-truck and log trailer parked next to the residence
fully involved in fire. The homeowner was outside the residence and uninjured. The vehicle fire was
quickly extinguished and the residence was not damaged.

The semi and trailer were heavily damaged by the fire. A representative of Jackson Truck Repair and
Hauling, the owner of the truck, came to the scene. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Fire District 2 responded with 9 personnel and 4 apparatus to the fire. Personnel were on-scene for
approximately an hour insuring that the fire was out in the vehicle.

Grays Harbor Fire District No. 2 and the Central Park Volunteer Firefighters Association will be hosting its Annual Christmas Open House and pictures with Santa Clause on December 13th at Station 31 (Central Park), 6317 Olympic Highway from 1 to 3 p.m.

This is an annual event that kicks off the Christmas season for the Fire District with members giving Santa Clause a ride on the fire engine throughout the Central Park community starting at 9 a.m.  Bells will be ringing, and sirens will be announcing his arrival.

Following Santa’s travels, join Santa at 1:00 p.m. at the fire station for pictures, snacks and craft tables for the kids.

Grays Harbor Fire District is is now taking applications for Volunteer Firefighter / EMT for the fall interview process. Volunteers will begin the 2016 year with the fire academy that will prepare volunteers for a great experience that can assist them in serving their community. All training is provided at no cost, however volunteers must be over the age of 18. For more information visit the volunteer information page at http://ghfd2.org/volunteer/ Applications are due by October 31st. 

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